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Making Your Own Opportunities

Making Your Own Opportunities

Making Your Own Opportunities

Jain Lemos

Jain Lemos is a New York Times No. 1 bestselling book producer, noted photography publishing expert, author and innovator.

Making Your Own Opportunities

People working in the arts industry are using old strategies that are played out. Traditional revenue models have tapped out and shiny objects have distracted our clients to the point where they no longer bother looking for anyone new. Are you ready to move past “cross your fingers” marketing?

An online marketing seminar opened with this claim: “The more you love and serve your clients, the more money you’re going to make.” That is mostly true, but if you don’t deliver the best service or find the right clients, chances are your income isn’t going to increase very significantly.

Too often, those working in the photography and arts industry are stuck on one setting: They’ve been told to find a specialty and stay with it until it pays off. Their pricing is based on what they believe the competition is charging or what they think a client will pay. Some pay expensive consultants who pile so much work on their plates, they fail before they start.

We’ve all been guilty of following instead of leading in this business. That weakness has made us vulnerable to large and powerful conglomerates who are more interested in selling us their platforms and services instead of truly helping us succeed. We look around at the wrong people for our inspiration and stay behind our screens and shutters instead of speaking out. Oh, we vent in frustration on forums or in association meetings. But true change and empowerment rarely ensues.

“Don’t lose the most likely people looking for you by throwing out a net so wide they bail.”

JAIN LEMOS

Are you satisfied?

Why aren’t we delivering value for our clients and freedom for ourselves? Shouldn’t we be setting the terms and conditions we want to operate and engage in? Instead, we accept our place, frantically watching everyone else to see what we should be doing.

Forget the old models of pricing and embrace the concept of selling whatever you offer as an experience.

Consider what you’ve done in the past. Those low-ticket funnel tactics with an opt-in for free stuff followed by endless upsell offers for packages or subscriptions? Totally outdated. First of all, most people know to avoid these like the plague. Secondly, if someone finds you in the first place, why are you waving a $9.00 thing in front of their face if it isn’t going to help them?

Unless your game is data mining or capturing email addresses is making you a boatload of cash, don’t lose the most likely people looking for you by throwing out a net so wide they bail, leaving you dancing for the bottom feeders.

Yes, it’s broken

Content marketing has also been played to death; the results look more and more like spam every day. You were told to build your audience by:

  • joining every social platform
  • increasing followers
  • producing podcasts
  • posting YouTube segments
  • blogging for high-traffic stats
  • paying for SEO
  • writing a book
  • getting on the speaker circuit

and don’t forget…

  • networking for those referrals

At the end of the day, you just added to the endless noise, finding yourself nowhere closer to your endgame. What, then, is the answer?

I say it’s reaching out with offers that are transformational for everyone. This requires a basic shift in your beliefs. The framework has to include an experience that creates outcomes that wouldn’t have been realized without you. You have to lead and be a partner at the same time.

If you would like to explore this concept with me and hear how I can help you, please drop me a line.

“Forget the old models of pricing and embrace the concept of selling whatever you offer as an experience.”

JAIN LEMOS
Making Your Own Opportunities

Making Your Own Opportunities

People working in the arts industry are using old strategies that are played out. Traditional revenue models have tapped out and shiny objects have distracted our clients to the point where they no longer bother looking for anyone new. Are you ready to move past “cross your fingers” marketing?

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

Searching around in a bunch of repositories, I found a way to mash up all the topics into a mega list and ended up with 214 topics as a jumping off point. If you are writing about photography, this should be helpful as a guidepost.

Is It Time to Embrace Blockchain?

Is It Time to Embrace Blockchain?

After reading several articles on how blockchain is going to revolutionize stock photography and eliminate copyright infringement, some authors were confused while others found the technology impracticable for how the industry actually works. Here’s what I found out.

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

Jain Lemos

Jain Lemos is a New York Times No. 1 bestselling book producer, noted photography publishing expert, author and innovator.

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

By now you’ve visited websites that promise you a shiny object the second you arrive: “Download our free guide to XYZ.” The only cost to you will be coughing up an email address so they can hit you up for more expensive sparkling objects down the line. We are not doing that. At least not yet, lol.

What do I write about next?

Since launching Photo Ten Five on March 20 of this year, I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how many articles there are each day to select as features. Chris MacAskill, co-founder of Cake told me, “I can’t imagine how you come up with all those links, but a few of them draw me in every time I go there.” That is exactly what we are trying to do.

I’ve also noticed that certain topics tend to make the rounds during a two-to-three day period and I have a few inclinations of who is starting the trends. Why not let Photo Ten Five do all the heavy lifting for you? Naturally, many topics are guided by the seasons or milestones. Some photo writers pick up on another’s opinion and flip it. Coming up with topics is probably easy enough, but trying to generate new stories with original viewpoints is much harder.

“Coming up with topics is probably easy enough, but trying to generate new stories with original viewpoints is much harder.”

JAIN LEMOS

BY THE NUMBERS —

There is a lot of fluff published online and we are probably all guilty of posting something in a rush that reads rather lame a few weeks on. A week or so ago I was complaining in a comment after Beate Chelette’s article on bad LinkedIn marketing. I said that posts using headlines with numbers (i.e., 5 Horrible Ways to Sell Art or 10 Really Awesome Tips for Street Shooting) drive me crazy. And here I am with a number in this headline.

Searching around in a bunch of repositories, I found a way to mash up all the topics into a mega list and ended up with 214 topics as a jumping off point. If you are writing about photography, this should be helpful as a guidepost. A few on the list are sort of confusing to me. What do you think “Big Photography” is about?

You can download a PDF of the list here. The only requirement (ah, there’s always a catch) is to send us a link to your next story if you would like us to mention it!

Making Your Own Opportunities

Making Your Own Opportunities

People working in the arts industry are using old strategies that are played out. Traditional revenue models have tapped out and shiny objects have distracted our clients to the point where they no longer bother looking for anyone new. Are you ready to move past “cross your fingers” marketing?

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

214 Photography Topics You Can Write About

Searching around in a bunch of repositories, I found a way to mash up all the topics into a mega list and ended up with 214 topics as a jumping off point. If you are writing about photography, this should be helpful as a guidepost.

Is It Time to Embrace Blockchain?

Is It Time to Embrace Blockchain?

After reading several articles on how blockchain is going to revolutionize stock photography and eliminate copyright infringement, some authors were confused while others found the technology impracticable for how the industry actually works. Here’s what I found out.